How to Acquire Antibiotics for Sale

In the old days, no one can acquire antibiotics for sale if they do not have a doctor’s prescription for it.   Most people of those ages do think that it is rightly appropriate to first have a doctor’s prescription or at least his recommendation in order for one to be allowed to get some antibiotics for sale to treat their ailments, but today, due to modern advancements in science, health and technology, this way of thinking is now being overlooked.  The way most of us think about antibiotics today is also different, too.  When we get a bacterial infection, we would usually want to get it treated right away, and that’s what antibiotics for sale without a prescription is all about.

You may be wondering, how can one acquire antibiotics for sale without a prescription by a doctor? If you live in the United States or any similar country, then most of the times it would be difficult for you to be able to buy some antibiotics for sale right at your local pharmacy’s counter.  In reality, there is a way on how to get some antibiotics for sale even without a doctor’s prescription on hand, and there are actually 4 ways: through a pet store, take a trip to Mexico, visit an oriental/ethnic market or convenience store, or you can buy antibiotics for sale via the Internet.

If you are already a pet lover or you have a pet at home, for example, a fish, then any pharmacist will say to you that human antibiotics are usually used to treat fish diseases, and you do not need a prescription just to buy antibiotics for your pet fish.  Some antibiotics for sale available at pet stores where you do not need a prescription are: ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline in either tablet or capsule form. Most people would think it’s not a great idea to take vet medicines; however, in chemical form, these drugs are actually the same as what you will get from a local pharmacy meant for human use. Read more…

Ontario physicians emulate Schwarzenegger

Legislation passed last week in California to ban smoking in cars when a child is present, and the Ontario Medical Association took notice. Now, they are asking Ontario to do the same thing. (And they're not afraid to use awful puns in the Terminator-referencing title of their press release.)

Based on what Ontario health minister George Smitherman , the doctors' prayers may just be answered:

You've suggested the smoking ban should be extended into people's homes. Doesn't that strike you as a little Big Brother-ish? I don't think we all want to live in a place where every third person is a bylaw enforcement officer, but we have to work hard to find a balance there. When I pull up beside a car — and it doesn't happen often, but I am observant — and see someone is smoking with a kid in the car, I'm inclined to draw awareness.

You mean you yell at them to butt out? If I can get their attention, yeah.

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QC new-immigrant medicare restriction under fire

Protesters are denouncing the province's policy of forcing new immigrants to wait three months before they qualify for Quebec public health insurance today in front of Quebec health minister Philippe Couillard's Montreal office, .

The demonstration, staged by Health Care for All, began yesterday and continued through the night as four protesters camped outside the government offices .

Health Care for All says some immigrant families rack up as much as $63,000 in debt for medical care, as in . The group alleges the three-month delay policy amounts to discrimination against immigrants -- a touchy point these days in Quebec as the Taylor-Bouchard commission on reasonable accommodation is still underway.

A spokesperson for Dr Couillard told the CBC the policy prevents people from coming to Quebec only to take advantage of the healthcare system. The health insurance agency recommends new residents take out private health insurance until they get their Quebec health
cards.

The government's policy is described online. Quebec exempts temporary workers and season farm workers from the three-month delay. Ontario's policy is similar, but allows more exemptions, including for newborns, discharged Canadian military personnel and elderly patients in assisted-living homes. British Columbia and New Brunswick also require three months of residency before immigrants qualify for public health insurance.

The BC Civil Liberties Association last year pressed health minister George Abbott to exempt temporary farm workers from the three-month waiting period. In (PDF), the BCCLA suggest failure to cover those workers immediately is in breach of the Canada Health Act, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and perhaps the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

In 1998, the Canadian Council for Refugees to insist Canadian provinces' waiting periods for medicare meant that Canada was breaking its commitments under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. (Quebec's three-month delay came into effect in 2001.)

McGill professor of social work Jill Hanley, PhD wrote outlining the difficulties posed for women by these waiting periods.

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