Why You Shouldn’t Mix Alcohol with Metronidazole Pills

Many times we are told by our doctors not to combine certain medicines with other drugs and chemicals due to its potential side effects and drug interactions. Before you are prescribed with certain medicines by your doctor, you should be well aware of the precautions as well as how the medications will function so that you will know what to expect. Generally this is part of the patient safety rules. That is why you will find a leaflet packed together with the medicines you have bought so you can have something to glance on during your treatment. Leaflets contain the general instructions, precautions, the general dos and don’ts, as well as a brief list of drugs or chemical that you should never combine with your medication.

Metronidazole pills are antibacterial drugs with its sole purpose to kill and eliminate infections caused by various types of bacteria and parasites. Most of these infections can occur in the digestive tract, genital area, lungs, and other internal organs. With metronidazole pills it is easier to eliminate such body intruders by simply killing the pathogens and parasites and prevent them from coming back.

Although Metronidazole pills are very powerful and beneficial antibiotic, take note that it is still a drug that might have some drawbacks especially when taken together with other chemicals and drugs. That is why you need to discuss with your doctor about your treatment prior of taking Metronidazole pills. Among the most prohibited chemicals that you should never ingest with metronidazole is alcohol. So what makes Metronidazole pills and alcohol a dangerous combo? Read more…

This month in medical poetry: March

Welcome to the first edition of a new monthly feature here at Canadian Medicine: "This month in medical poetry." (Yes, I know it's April now. Oh well.)

The practice of publishing poetry in medical journals is fairly widespread. The leaders, so far as I know, are the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), which both publish poetry in just about every issue. I should note, however, that I use the word 'leaders' loosely here -- many of the poems that appear in these journals, and others, are spectacularly bad. And therein lies much of the fun in reading them.

By the way, that man pictured above is Dr William Carlos Williams, the patron saint of doctor-poets, a man better known for his poetry than his pediatrics work.

You can check out all the poems in CMAJ and JAMA from March below:


"Joceyln's choice" by Dr Tara Tucker, CMAJ, March 25
The full text is available on the CMAJ's website. Here's a taste -- brace yourself:

Dignity lost, depths of pain so vast
"Total Pain" we called it
Spiritual
Physical
Emotional
Social
what more was there to hurt?
we named it, you understood

"Ladan and Laleh" by Dr Normand Carrey, CMAJ, March 11


"" by Dr Frank DeCicco, JAMA*, March 26

"" by Dr Frank DeCicco, JAMA, March 19

"" by Dr Frank DeCicco, JAMA, March 12

"" by Dr Frank DeCicco, JAMA, March 5

*JAMA requires an online subscription, unfortunately. These links lead to versions that are sometimes abbreviated if the poems are longer, but I encourage you to find a password and read the whole things.


How to submit your poem
CMAJ uses a service called Manuscript Central to manage their submissions; you can visit their page . There's information for potential authors on their website.

JAMA's poetry editor is Charlene Breedlove, an associate editor with the journal. Submissions are to be sent to . JAMA also uses , but apparently not for poetry.

Check out our website: