Vardenafil HCl is the Fastest Acting ED Medication

It cannot be denied that most men with erectile dysfunction (ED) owe Viagra a ‘thanks’ because it was them who pioneered ED medications.  If not for them, there might be no ED medications today.  Of course, this does not mean you will need to stick to that brand forever because there are other and much better ED medications in the market today than that of V…ra.  Take for instance, vardenafil HCl.  This ED drug is considered to be the most effective there is and has even surpassed Viagra in terms of efficacy.

According to different surveys performed, Viagra only has an average of 84% efficacy, whereas vardenafil HCl dominates it with 86% percent.  While the 2% may not seem much, if you belong to that group, then it means a lot.  For this reason, a lot of previous Viagra users have switch ship and are now taking vardenafil HCl as their preferred ED treatment drug of choice.  They even claim that they now experience fewer side effects ever since they moved to using vardenafil HCl. Read more…

What's in the news: August 28

A round-up of Canadian health news, from coast to coast to coast, and beyond, for Thursday, August 28.

The Maple Leaf listeriosis outbreak persists, as the Canadian Press carries a story published in the Chronicle-Herald today under the bold (and quesionable) heading "Listeria could be re-election hazard," going so far as to compare the federal government's food-safety monitoring problems to past issues like the water contamination at Walkerton, and the financial scandals that plagued Paul Martin's Liberal minority.

The Conservatives have dropped their support for Bill C-484, the Unborn Victims of Crime Act, a private member's bill proposed by Tory MP Ken Epps that would have made it a separate crime to kill a fetus in the case of a murder of a pregnant woman. Justice Minister Rob Nicholson announced that the government plans instead to introduce legislation that would allow judges to consider pregnancy as an "aggravating factor" when sentencing convicted criminals. Mr Epps, however, says he will continue to stand behind his proposed law even though it is now doomed. Mr Epps is backed by a small group of stalwart supporters in Parliament. The Canadian Medical Association, meanwhile, was eager to take credit for the government's decision to drop C-484, in light of a motion proposed by a delegate last week at the organization's Annual Meeting. The motion opposed "... any legislation that would result in compromising access for women to the medical services required to terminate a pregnancy." [CMA News]

Quebec will not open its own safe-injection site for drug addicts, after all. Health Minister Yves Bolduc's office said last week, sounding uncannily like Tony Clement's cadre, that there isn't enough evidence yet to justify opening a facility similar to Vancouver's Insite. The announcement has angered a number of advocacy groups and public health workers, as well as the separatist opposition party, the Parti Québecois.

Should codeine be entirely removed from obstetrics wards? That's what a Vancouver perinatologist thinks after reading a study published online by U of T researcher Gideon Koren and others in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. The good doctor's outrage is late in coming, though; the "new" study simply confirms what Dr Koren has been saying for years now about the danger for some genetically predisposed women of breastfeeding while taking codeine. The case in which an infant died as a result happened back in 2005, and the National Review of Medicine covered his research last year.

Dr Gordon Guyatt, the McMaster epidemiology prof and health policy analyst known for coining the term "evidence-based medicine," is sounding more and more like a potential federal Parliamentarian* every day. *Correction: Dr Guyatt is , for the NDP in Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale, in Ontario, and he has run in three previous elections.
I meant to write that he is sounding more like an MP every day.

Check out the most recent edition of Health Wonk Review, featuring the best in health policy writing from the medical blogosphere. Canadian Medicine makes an appearance.