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How to Acquire Antibiotics for Sale

In the old days, no one can acquire antibiotics for sale if they do not have a doctor’s prescription for it.   Most people of those ages do think that it is rightly appropriate to first have a doctor’s prescription or at least his recommendation in order for one to be allowed to get some antibiotics for sale to treat their ailments, but today, due to modern advancements in science, health and technology, this way of thinking is now being overlooked.  The way most of us think about antibiotics today is also different, too.  When we get a bacterial infection, we would usually want to get it treated right away, and that’s what antibiotics for sale without a prescription is all about.

You may be wondering, how can one acquire antibiotics for sale without a prescription by a doctor? If you live in the United States or any similar country, then most of the times it would be difficult for you to be able to buy some antibiotics for sale right at your local pharmacy’s counter.  In reality, there is a way on how to get some antibiotics for sale even without a doctor’s prescription on hand, and there are actually 4 ways: through a pet store, take a trip to Mexico, visit an oriental/ethnic market or convenience store, or you can buy antibiotics for sale via the Internet.

If you are already a pet lover or you have a pet at home, for example, a fish, then any pharmacist will say to you that human antibiotics are usually used to treat fish diseases, and you do not need a prescription just to buy antibiotics for your pet fish.  Some antibiotics for sale available at pet stores where you do not need a prescription are: ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline in either tablet or capsule form. Most people would think it’s not a great idea to take vet medicines; however, in chemical form, these drugs are actually the same as what you will get from a local pharmacy meant for human use. Read more…

David Caplan aims for better, cheapter healthcare

It's been said that the Canadian model of healthcare insurance promises three things: high-quality care, for everyone, quickly. Reality falls short of the promise, of course. As the saying goes: pick two.

But David Caplan (left), the man selected to follow the controversial George Smitherman as health minister of Ontario a year ago this month, intends to make good on that promise. Universal coverage is a given, of course, but as for quality and efficiency -- well, let's just say that Canada is no Andorra. Maintaining a high level of quality has in some cases meant reduced access and longer wait times, and it's likewise assumed that providing all patients with family physicians (and the enviable same-day access patients in some other countries get) would compromise doctors' ability to give patients sufficient attention and deliver appropriate care.

Complicating matters is the fact that the rate at which governments' health spending has been increasing has outstripped growth in GDP for years, and seems likely to do so for years to come.

Mr Caplan's ambitious goal as health minister is to turn that move beyond the quality/wait-times binary and to save money in the process.

He explained his thinking to me in a long interview for the June issue of Parkhurst Exchange magazine:

"What I want to do is raise the quality of the healthcare experience, of healthcare service, because all of the literature I've read says that when you increase quality you increase efficiency and you increase sustainability and cost-effectiveness. That's the real way. The mistake I think governments have made in the past is they've tried to contain costs first and what you've seen is a degradation of quality. If you raise quality, and that's the goal, almost by definition it will logically follow that cost-effectiveness will result."
Read the full Q&A on the Parkhurst Exchange website, for more on health policy as well as a discussion of following in his mother's footsteps as health minister of Ontario, the decline and future of solo practice, Mr Caplan's struggles with his weight and smoking addiction, and more.

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1 comments:

  1. Rositta6 July, 2009 10:01 PM

    David Caplan is the most inept minister of health ever and I doubt he got the position based on ability.

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