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Say Goodbye to Erectile Dysfunction with Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction, abbreviated ED, and otherwise known as impotence in men, is the failure of a man to obtain and maintain an erection which is direly needed for engaging in sexual intercourse.

Erectile dysfunction is a condition that is very common in much older men.  It has been estimated that about half of all men who are within the bracket age of 40 to 70 may have ED at a certain degree.  Depending on the circumstances and on the individual himself, erectile dysfunction can also affect those who are younger, even if they are just around the age of 25 or more.

Why does ED Occur in some Men?  Erectile dysfunction causes actually vary, and they can be physically related or psychologically related.  Physical causes of ED may include hormonal issues, surgery or injury, tightening of the blood vessels that lead towards the penis which is usually linked to high cholesterol, hypertension, or diabetes.  Psychological (mental) causes of ED may include depression, anxiety or problems with relationships. Read more…

Suffering from administrative distress?

Fight back against paperwork-induced burnout

"I adore seeing patients, but what will drive me out of family practice eventually is the paperwork."

Sound familiar? If you spend hours each day filling out paperwork for which there’s no billing code, and if you spend your evenings and weekends completing form after endless form, and it's driving you up the wall — well, you're not alone. Recently, a team of Saskatchewan researchers set out to measure just how bad the problem has become.

In a study published In March's Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, psychiatrist David Keegan and researchers Rein Lepnurm and Wallace Lockhart measured what they called the "daily distress" of doctors. They asked physicians across the country about their professional and personal lives: anger at colleagues, frustration with demanding patients, ability to sleep soundly, whether work responsibilities interfered with home lives, etc.

The study's results (PDF) were, well, deeply distressing. According to their measures, slightly more than 50% of doctors experience very serious distress several times a month; another 37% are in distress at least once a week.

Read the rest of this article, from the June issue of Parkhurst Exchange, online here.

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1 comments:

  1. sharon7 July, 2009 11:54 AM

    RE: administrative burnout for doctors

    Considering:

    1. their own list of limitations in the report

    2. reporting " findings" is not the same as reporting solutions

    3. discussion needed on the development and ways to use an assessment tool

    4. the strange remark "“adaptive character trait of compulsiveness” . Is that in a textbook somewhere?

    Suggestion:

    Use printed clinical carepaths with checklists and comment beside each "performance' step. Add a time spent box.

    Then at some future time... use the results for the formation of a "cheat sheet' for routine visits....

    Then.. use data collected to formulate an argument for "billing changes" based on time spent ( either to funder or patient )

    Delete