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Why You Shouldn’t Mix Alcohol with Metronidazole Pills

Many times we are told by our doctors not to combine certain medicines with other drugs and chemicals due to its potential side effects and drug interactions. Before you are prescribed with certain medicines by your doctor, you should be well aware of the precautions as well as how the medications will function so that you will know what to expect. Generally this is part of the patient safety rules. That is why you will find a leaflet packed together with the medicines you have bought so you can have something to glance on during your treatment. Leaflets contain the general instructions, precautions, the general dos and don’ts, as well as a brief list of drugs or chemical that you should never combine with your medication.

Metronidazole pills are antibacterial drugs with its sole purpose to kill and eliminate infections caused by various types of bacteria and parasites. Most of these infections can occur in the digestive tract, genital area, lungs, and other internal organs. With metronidazole pills it is easier to eliminate such body intruders by simply killing the pathogens and parasites and prevent them from coming back.

Although Metronidazole pills are very powerful and beneficial antibiotic, take note that it is still a drug that might have some drawbacks especially when taken together with other chemicals and drugs. That is why you need to discuss with your doctor about your treatment prior of taking Metronidazole pills. Among the most prohibited chemicals that you should never ingest with metronidazole is alcohol. So what makes Metronidazole pills and alcohol a dangerous combo? Read more…

Does the CMA have a conflict of interests on electronic medical records?

Try to reconcile the following two facts:

1. Though some consolidation in the Canadian electronic medical records market is not necessarily a bad thing and may in fact be necessary, healthy competition between software companies in that market is important for the development of the industry and for both the continuing improvement of the products offered to physicians and to keep software prices down.

2. One of the country's leading (and growing) EMR software providers is Practice Solutions, which is owned by a Canadian Medical Association subsidiary company called CMA Holdings Incorporated. CMA Holdings, like just about every other investor, had a rough year; its contribution to the CMA's operating budget was slashed in 2009, prompting $1.003 million in budget costs at the CMA. Meanwhile, Practice Solutions, from all signs, is going strong. According to a report from CMA Holdings president/CEO Brian Peters in the CMA's 2008-09 Year in Review report, Practice Solutions has managed to grab a 47% share of the EMR market in Ontario and is expanding into Alberta and Saskatchewan now.

Now consider this. On the one hand, Practice Solutions's business success should come as good news for CMA members at a time when CMA Holdings could use the help. But, on the other hand -- keeping in mind fact #1 above -- the rapid growth of one EMR provider at the expense of a more diverse market may be a dangerous sign for CMA members who use electronic records in their offices.

These two facts may not be irreconcilable, however. One clue came this morning at the CMA's General Council meeting in Saskatoon when one member as well as new president Dr Anne Doig pressed federal health minister Leona Aglukkaq to release a promised $500 million in new funding for Canada Health Infoway, which funds provinces' initiatives to encourage and incentivize doctors to adopt electronic records. If doctors can convince government to spend taxpayers' money to pay for their record-keeping systems, then why should they care what the software costs?

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1 comments:

  1. sharon18 August, 2009 8:52 AM

    RE: use of government funds

    "incentivize" monies are not the same as " pay for" monies

    Delete