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Learn about Erectile Dysfunction and Sildenafil Citrate Online

Have you ever wondered how sildenafil acts within your body to help you solve your problems with erectile dysfunction?  Thanks to the instant availability of the Internet and computer devices, you will now be able to learn about ED and sildenafil citrate online right at your fingertips.

If you are curious as to how PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil work inside your body, then you can browse on search engines by simply typing in the search box the words sildenafil citrate online.  When you read about the mechanics of the action of sildenafil citrate online, you will learn that it helps protect the enzyme cGMP (short for cyclic guanosine monophosphate) from being degraded by the cGMP-specific PDE5 (short for phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme) which are evidently located in the penile corpus cavernosum of men.  The free radical NO (short for nitric oxide) found in the penile corpus cavernosum adheres itself to what are called the guanylate cyclase receptors, which then results to the occurrence of elevated amounts of cGMP, thereby leading to the vasodilation or relaxation of the smooth muscles of the inner lining cushions of the helicine arteries (tendril-like arteries of the penis importantly involved in the process of its erection).  Once the smooth muscles relax, it will result to vasodilation and therefore there will be an increased supply of blood flowing into the penile spongy tissue, and the end result would be a successful penile erection.

Additionally, what you would also learn about sildenafil citrate online is that its special molecular makeup is somewhat similar to cGMP (located in the penile corpus cavernosum as well) and functions as an aggressive binding element of PDE5 in the penile corpus cavernosum, which results to more concentrations of cGMP and even better occurrences of erections. Avery important information that men will learn through reading about sildenafil citrate online is that sildenafil will be rendered useless without the introduction of one or more sexual stimuli, since only a sexual stimulus will be the only factor that can initiate the activation of the nitric oxide and cGMP inside a man’s body. Read more…

What's in the news: Sep. 18: The latest on the H1N1 flu in Canada

Will the H1N1 flu vaccine be available too late to protect some Canadians? [Toronto Star]

On the bright side, it appears that one dose of the vaccine, as opposed to the two doses that were inefficiently predicted to be required, will be sufficient to confer protection. [MedPage Today] [NEJM study] [Another NEJM study] [And yet another NEJM study]

Dr Kumanan Wilson, the Canada Research Chair in Public Health Policy, at the University of Ottawa, discussed why young Canadians don't want the vaccine. [Globe and Mail]

The current issue of the Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases & Medical Microbiology has several articles on the H1N1 flu of interest to clinicians, including one on treating kids, one on what we've learned so far about the pandemic virus, and one about the work that went into preparing for this outbreak. See the journal's TOC here.

The hot topic this week is the story out of Manitoba about accusations that Health Canada shipped body bags to First Nations reserves in preparation for this fall or winter's second wave of the flu. Federal health minister Leona Aglukkaq, an Inuit from Nunavut, is on the hot seat and has promised an investigation, while a Health Canada bureaucrat denied the shipment had anything to do with the flu. [Canadian Press] The story sure looks bad for Health Canada, which earlier this year delayed sending alcohol-based hand disinfectant gel to Manitoba reserves because of concerns in Ottawa that people there would try to eat the gel to get drunk. "The discussion was with the best interests of our clients in mind," Anne-Marie Robinson, the assistant deputy minister of the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of the federal health ministry, said at the time. [Canadian Medicine]

A second case of drug-resistant H1N1 flu was identified in Canada. The first was in Quebec; this one is in Alberta. [Canadian Press]

New research has revealed some bad news: the H1N1 flu virus is contagious longer than was previously thought. Quebec researchers determined that 15% of patients infected with the H1N1 strain were still contagious on the eighth day of their infection, but that no one was contagious on the eleventh day. [Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec news release]

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2 comments:

  1. Purley Quirt (aka Sharon )18 September, 2009 10:23 AM

    Excellent overview, Sam.

    This referenced material from your listings stands out for me:

    http://www.pulsus.com:80/journals/toc.jsp?origPg=toc.jsp&sCurrPg=journal&jnlKy=3&fold=Current%20Issue&&HCtype=Physician

    Influenza mixes its pitches: Lessons learned to date from the Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic
    DN Fisman, KB Laupland

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  2. Florida19 September, 2009 4:36 PM

    good blog, good reference....very much

    Delete