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As a man, it is your duty to sexually please your female partner.  Although the duty goes both ways, nevertheless, it is still necessary to make sure that she is sexually satisfied.  However, if you suffer from premature ejaculation, it is likely that you are not able to fulfill the sexual satisfaction she requires.  The truth is, sexual dissatisfaction is not uncommon for couples as most men tend to blow their load off much earlier than their partner.  With practice though, most are able to develop techniques that allows them to hold their load off much longer thereby allowing them to satisfy the female first before releasing theirs.  You can also use dapoxetine Priligy if techniques do not work out well for you. Read more…

What's in the news: Sep. 28 -- Who gets treated first in a pandemic?


Who goes first?
Hamilton Health Sciences announces Canada's first priority-treatment plan for the H1N1 flu pandemic. [Hamilton Spectator] According to The Spectator, the priority list is as follows:

1. Health-care workers and other essential services such as firefighters and police officers because they have the skills to save others once they're better.

2. Those who caught the flu at work, particularly essential service workers, because they put themselves at risk to save others.

3. Caregivers of children, disabled adults or the elderly to minimize societal disruption.

4. Young people because they haven't had a chance to live their lives yet.

5. Those most likely to survive that particular strain of flu.
An HIV vaccine or another dashed hope?
Thai researchers announced encouraging results from a set of HIV-vaccine trials. The combo-vaccine that was being tested proved effective in 31% of patients, and many experts were cautious in expressing optimism about the first-ever positive results in an HIV-vaccine trial. [Globe and Mail]

No flu shots until puzzle resolved
Ontario health officials said they would delay distributing regular flu shots because as-yet-unpublished research has indicated that the regular flu shot may raise the risk of contracting the H1N1 flu. [Canadian Press] [CTV News] [Canadian Press]

NB finally fills trauma chief job
The province of New Brunswick has hired Dr Marcel Martin, a surgeon from Sherbrooke, Quebec, to run its trauma-care system, after an interminably long period in which no progress was made on trying to hire someone for the job. [CBC News]

Alberta political shakeup to come?
The right-wing Wildrose Alliance party could pick up as many as 10 Progressive Conservative defectors if leadership candidate Danielle Smith wins the primary election, the Edmonton Journal's Trish Audette reported. [Edmonton Journal] That would dramatically alter the provincial political scene, which has been dominated by the Tories since the Mesozoic Era or thereabouts. And as complaints about the size and nature of government spending on healthcare continue to plague the Stelmach government from the left, the right and the centre, it seems fair to say that the province's divisive health reform being ushered in by Health Minister Ron Liepert may be playing a big part in voters' disillusionment with the Conservatives. Then again, maybe it's just that oil and gas tax revenues are down. When the price of oil rises again, voters may forget their complaints about the Tories' management.

Photo: Shutterstock

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