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Propecia Generic For Male Pattern Baldness

The drug propecia generic was originally intended for treating prostate enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia. When its branded name Proscar was released in the market, it was noticed that men who were suffering from androgenic alopecia were also being treated by the drug.  It was then that the manufacturer took notice and created some clinical studies and found out that Proscar, which came at 5mg, which at lowered dosage, particularly 1mg, could help fight androgenic alopecia.  Several years later, the brand Propecia, an offshoot of the drug Proscar was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for androgenic alopecia.

Who is propecia generic intended for?

Propecia generic is meant for men suffering from male pattern baldness and want to stop the progression of their hair loss.  Signs of male pattern baldness would be the thinning of hair on the front, the receding of hairline on the temples, and the formation of a bald spot on the crown.  In due time, this type of baldness will let you end up bald from top to front with a rim of hair at the sides and back.  propecia generic is effective against this type of hair loss because it is able to treat it at the root of the cause – the formation of the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT).  Basically, this hair loss treatment prevents your hair loss from getting any worse.  If your hair loss is due to androgenic alopecia, then this is the medication for you.  Consult your doctor to know what type of hair loss you are having. Read more…

What's in the news: Sep. 28 -- Who gets treated first in a pandemic?


Who goes first?
Hamilton Health Sciences announces Canada's first priority-treatment plan for the H1N1 flu pandemic. [Hamilton Spectator] According to The Spectator, the priority list is as follows:

1. Health-care workers and other essential services such as firefighters and police officers because they have the skills to save others once they're better.

2. Those who caught the flu at work, particularly essential service workers, because they put themselves at risk to save others.

3. Caregivers of children, disabled adults or the elderly to minimize societal disruption.

4. Young people because they haven't had a chance to live their lives yet.

5. Those most likely to survive that particular strain of flu.
An HIV vaccine or another dashed hope?
Thai researchers announced encouraging results from a set of HIV-vaccine trials. The combo-vaccine that was being tested proved effective in 31% of patients, and many experts were cautious in expressing optimism about the first-ever positive results in an HIV-vaccine trial. [Globe and Mail]

No flu shots until puzzle resolved
Ontario health officials said they would delay distributing regular flu shots because as-yet-unpublished research has indicated that the regular flu shot may raise the risk of contracting the H1N1 flu. [Canadian Press] [CTV News] [Canadian Press]

NB finally fills trauma chief job
The province of New Brunswick has hired Dr Marcel Martin, a surgeon from Sherbrooke, Quebec, to run its trauma-care system, after an interminably long period in which no progress was made on trying to hire someone for the job. [CBC News]

Alberta political shakeup to come?
The right-wing Wildrose Alliance party could pick up as many as 10 Progressive Conservative defectors if leadership candidate Danielle Smith wins the primary election, the Edmonton Journal's Trish Audette reported. [Edmonton Journal] That would dramatically alter the provincial political scene, which has been dominated by the Tories since the Mesozoic Era or thereabouts. And as complaints about the size and nature of government spending on healthcare continue to plague the Stelmach government from the left, the right and the centre, it seems fair to say that the province's divisive health reform being ushered in by Health Minister Ron Liepert may be playing a big part in voters' disillusionment with the Conservatives. Then again, maybe it's just that oil and gas tax revenues are down. When the price of oil rises again, voters may forget their complaints about the Tories' management.

Photo: Shutterstock

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