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Propecia Generic For Male Pattern Baldness

The drug propecia generic was originally intended for treating prostate enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia. When its branded name Proscar was released in the market, it was noticed that men who were suffering from androgenic alopecia were also being treated by the drug.  It was then that the manufacturer took notice and created some clinical studies and found out that Proscar, which came at 5mg, which at lowered dosage, particularly 1mg, could help fight androgenic alopecia.  Several years later, the brand Propecia, an offshoot of the drug Proscar was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for androgenic alopecia.

Who is propecia generic intended for?

Propecia generic is meant for men suffering from male pattern baldness and want to stop the progression of their hair loss.  Signs of male pattern baldness would be the thinning of hair on the front, the receding of hairline on the temples, and the formation of a bald spot on the crown.  In due time, this type of baldness will let you end up bald from top to front with a rim of hair at the sides and back.  propecia generic is effective against this type of hair loss because it is able to treat it at the root of the cause – the formation of the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT).  Basically, this hair loss treatment prevents your hair loss from getting any worse.  If your hair loss is due to androgenic alopecia, then this is the medication for you.  Consult your doctor to know what type of hair loss you are having. Read more…

THE INTERVIEW: Dr Bonnie Henry, H1N1 flu fighter

In this month's issue of Parkhurst Exchange, which should be arriving on physicians' desks across the country right about now, you'll find a short Q&A with Dr Bonnie Henry (right), the BC Centre for Disease Control’s director of Public Health Emergency Management the author of the new book Soap and Water & Common Sense: The Definitive Guide to Viruses, Bacteria, Parasites, and Disease (Anansi).

Online, you can read the full version of the interview, in which we discuss the severity of this pandemic, the steps family physicians can take to make their waiting rooms safer, special billing codes for H1N1 flu consults, and the interesting and pertinent story behind how Canada decided to manufacture its own vaccines after the 1976 swine flu, among other things.

Click here to read the full interview.


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