Propecia Generic For Male Pattern Baldness

The drug propecia generic was originally intended for treating prostate enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia. When its branded name Proscar was released in the market, it was noticed that men who were suffering from androgenic alopecia were also being treated by the drug.  It was then that the manufacturer took notice and created some clinical studies and found out that Proscar, which came at 5mg, which at lowered dosage, particularly 1mg, could help fight androgenic alopecia.  Several years later, the brand Propecia, an offshoot of the drug Proscar was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for androgenic alopecia.

Who is propecia generic intended for?

Propecia generic is meant for men suffering from male pattern baldness and want to stop the progression of their hair loss.  Signs of male pattern baldness would be the thinning of hair on the front, the receding of hairline on the temples, and the formation of a bald spot on the crown.  In due time, this type of baldness will let you end up bald from top to front with a rim of hair at the sides and back.  propecia generic is effective against this type of hair loss because it is able to treat it at the root of the cause – the formation of the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT).  Basically, this hair loss treatment prevents your hair loss from getting any worse.  If your hair loss is due to androgenic alopecia, then this is the medication for you.  Consult your doctor to know what type of hair loss you are having. Read more…

Minister Matthews wouldn't "...call them kickbacks…but there are people who would."


"Allowances" given Ontario to pharmacists by generic drug companies are to be eliminated said the province's health minister Deb Matthews on Wednesday.

The idea is that the annual $750 million "subsidy" is to be used to pay for services to patients but even the pharmacists concede that 70% of the money is treated as rebates to fund operations and hike profits. Ms Matthews suggests ending the practice could reduce the cost of generics by half. To compensate, the minister suggested that the government will increase dispensing fees by $1 -- to a total of $150 million to offset the reduction.

Donnie Edwards, a pharmacist in Ridgeway, Ontario thinks not:

"When you take $3 out and put $1 back in... I don't think so. These dollars were used for professional services that pharmacists do everyday, in every town in this provinces"

Research based pharmaceutical companies support the change. Russell Williams, president of Rx&D, the companies' association, said: "As partners in the health care system, we want to work with the government and health care providers to ensure that patients have access to the most appropriate treatment… through timely access to innovative medicines and vaccines… ."

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3 comments:

said...

Congratulation to the Health Minister in Ontario!!!!!!!!!!!

RE: the "big box" pharmacy

Unless they are brain-dead at the TMT level there will be no cutback in services to the individual consumer unless it is companioned with equivalent reduction in the cost of the drug itself.
There are enough big league competitors smart enough to keep their mouth shut that will pick up the " shopping savvy" elder market who often ? require several medications.

RE: the pharmacist himself

the restructuring of how monies are distributed to assist the end-user ( the patient) will probably include broadening the prescription " authority" of the pharmacist and related " right-to-bill" opportunities. Therefore there is no plight for the pharmacist himself.

RE: generic providers

they should enter the market-at-large in the same context that " No Frills" stores compete in the world of groceteria

RE: online shopping for medications

there should be significant savings offered to clients for automatic " at-home shopping and reordering" because this automatic refilling without a stop order ........ is a far bigger money-maker than any storefront.

Summary

There is the never discussed difference between the generic drug quality and the " name brand". There needs to be a broadening of the arena where the name brand exposes itself to a more diverse field in the area of " distribution channels"

On a personal note:

A vocal response from a consumer.... to the vocal response of this particular provider identified as Shoppers Drug Mart:

Let's do a SWOT from the SDM perspective:

I have never been in a Shoppers Drug Mart where the consumer presence is larger than the staff presence. (W)

To top it off they diversify the OTC drug selection so broadly that the "brand name" often gets sold at sale prices as it nears expiry dates ( works for me! ) (W)(T)
However their pharmacists are working full throttle ( hmmmmmmm!) (S)(T)

We consumers would welcome a "photoshop-style" drive through for medications only. The in-store imitation of boutique Wal-mart just can't compete in selection, price, and quantity.(W)

And what makes you think after the big prescription drug consumers pay for their medication that they can afford to buy anything else in your store.......... the " no frills' stores have a pharmacy.

NOW..... if I was a TMT at SDM I would take a second look at those fabulous , easily identified , quasi "art deco "exteriors of the SDM outlets.....
They would make fabulous "diners". The architecture screams " Diner" ...don't you think!(S) (S) (S) (S)

Even in hard times "diners" are always full... and once upon a time Drug stores always had a lunch bar and soda fountain........ how about a breakfast special for Seniors ...while their prescription is being filled :)

time to "diversify".... not just replicate........

said...

good thanks for this

Anonymous said...

Finally, lower generic drug prices! This is something that needed to be addressed as anyone who has to take daily medication knows. Ontario had some of the highest generic drug prices around. Check out this video to learn more.

http://mthirty.com/mtrack/r/mohvideo

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M THIRTY has shared a message with you on behalf of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care http://mthirty.com/mtrack/r/mohtransparency1