Why Use Fluconazole Treatment

One of the nastiest types of infection is fungal infection.  Although they are more likely to grow on the skin, there are more serious ones though that develops in the respiratory system and infect not just the lungs, but also the blood and other parts of the body’s internal structure.  When you develop a fungal infection, it is vital that you treat the infection as soon as possible to prevent further growth, development, and spread of the infection.  Failure to do so may mean longer and costlier treatment.  Fluconazole treatment is needed for treating fungal infection.  Fluconazole treatment is an antifungal medication treatment that you take orally.

Most antifungals are applied on the skin directly to where the infection has developed.  However, if the infection has buried further or deeper in to the skin, or the infection has developed inside of the body, such topical type of antifungal will not work on such.  For cases like this, fluconazole treatment is necessary as fluconazole treatment comes in pill form which you take orally.  The treatment process in using fluconazole treatment is the purging of the infection from the inside of your body.  This effectively gets rid of the infection from your system.

For antifungal fluconazole treatment, it is necessary that you use fluconazole treatment for a course of several days.  The number of days you need to use fluconazole treatment depends on the type of infection that you have developed and the severity that it has.  Course treatment is necessary in completely getting rid of an infection from the body.  This is the very reason why doctors prescribe patients with several days of use of fluconazole treatment when they have a fungal infection.  By completing the course of fluconazole treatment, you will be able to completely purge the fungal infection out of the body. Read more…

Patients who disappear


It's 11:30 am, do you know how to reach your patients? You may think you do but the reality may be quite different. The use of cell phones, combined with the recession have played havoc with many patient record files. The contact numbers are often obsolete.

It goes like this:

1) Patient suffers loss of income

2) Patient cancels land line

3) Patient uses cell

4) Patient looses cell (or can't afford the charges)

5) Patient can't be found.

Dr Perri Klass, a New York physician, noticed an unexpected jump in the head-size of a at the three-month check up. Problem was it made the observation in review the file. After reviewing the case he feared hydrocephalus and other congenital brain malfunctions. He wanted the baby to come back into for a closer look but was unable to contact the baby's mother. None of the phone numbers in her file worked. Eventually he tracked her down through a sister. The child came in and was found to be perfectly healthy. The incident gave the doctor pause.

The lesson: check phone numbers every time a patient comes in. Even then you may find yourself marking too many patient files "lost to followup."

Dr Klass's full article can be found in the April 15 issue of New England Journal of Medicine. NEJM.org

2 comments:

said...

The article is very interesting & true, I really like it, now a day’s is very expensive.

said...

Great points noticed.Good to know of it.