Are You Going to Use Finasteride for Hair Loss? Read This First

Sold in the market under the brand names Propecia and Proscar, finasteride is a medication that is intended to treat people who are suffering from hair loss.  In the early days, finasteride was just like other medications that were originally used to treat benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostate cancer. It turns out that patients who took finasteride for their prostate-related issues had experienced great results with it, along with a surprising bonus, and that is, the growth of hair.

Finasteride actually works by means of inhibiting or stopping type II 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme responsible for converting the hormone testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT).  DHT, in turn, is the one responsible for losing one’s hair, resulting to baldness if not remedied.  Thus, simply put, the action of finasteride is to prevent the conversion of testosterone into DHT, and the end result would be the prevention of hair loss. This “favorable side effect” of preventing hair loss and promoting growth of new hair by finasteride is what made it famous in the pharmaceutical world, not by its primary use which is for treating benign prostatic hypertrophy and other prostate-related ailments. Read more…

Not out of the woods yet

Last year, Canada saw the biggest increase in new physicians in 20 years. About 2,700 extra practitioners brought the national total to around 68,000, according to figures released by CIHI, the Canadian Institute for Health Information.

Most of the new physicians, about 2,300, were graduates of Canadian medical schools. A few more doctors returned to Canada than went abroad in 2009, perhaps partly due to the weakening of the US dollar. And about 300 new doctors were international medical graduates.

Until about 2004, the number of physicians was barely keeping pace with the rising population. From 2004 to 2008, the rate of increase in physicians was double that of the general population. The 2009 increase was three times faster than the rate of increase of the population.

Clearly, steps are being taken to address Canada’s chronic physician shortage. But a crunch is still coming, and this may not be enough to divert it.

For the first time in decades, the average age of physicians didn’t increase in 2009. But it didn’t decrease either, hovering at 49.7 years. Is there any other job on earth where the average age is 50? Maybe being a nun. Meanwhile, the population ages apace. Older patients mean greater need, older doctors mean less provision.

This is not to suggest that older doctors work less. On the contrary, many do longer hours than their younger colleagues. And many are delaying retirement. Quite a few may have been burned in the stock market collapse, and the 2009 figures may partly reflect their decision to work a few more years to replenish the retirement fund. Others aren’t retiring simply because they can’t find a replacement to take on their patients. Of physicians aged 70-79 in 2004, most were still working in 2008, a feat of endurance surely unmatched in any other profession.

But retirement must come eventually. And with an average professional age of 50, the numbers leaving are going to be significant.

At the same time, their young replacements appear to be working shorter hours. Doctors today want a life as well as a career. And the dramatic increase in female doctors means more family responsibilities – women doctors average about 8 hours less work per week. They have also proved more likely, in the past, to drop the profession altogether. Of the new class of 2009, 52% of general practitioners and 45% of specialists were women.

(Ratios of women to men, strangely, vary quite sharply from one province to another. In Quebec, for example, the numbers are almost even, while in Manitoba male doctors outnumber female by 2-to-1.)

Family practice continues to get short-changed, though the picture is improving. In 2004, just 23% of medical students said they wanted to go into family practice. In 2009, that had jumped to 33%. But it needs to be 40% to meet the actual need.

And why is the need growing faster than the population? Because, of course, of the ageing of Canada. In 1921, one Canadian in 20 was aged over 65. Today, it’s one in eight. In 2026, it will hit one in five. And the “oldest old”, the 85-plus, is the fastest-growing group of all. Consumption of healthcare is astronomically higher in these age brackets. We’re not out of the woods yet.
Owen Dyer

12 comments:

  1. sharon [aka purley quirt]Dec 4, 2010 05:23 AM
    RE: the difference between "census" and "survey" data

    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/conferences/symposium2010/abs-res-eng.htm#a4

    paste

    02A-3 - Cycle 2 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey: Combining Census and administrative data to improve the efficiency of the survey frame

    Suzelle Giroux, Statistique Canada
    France Labrecque, Statistique Canada

    The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) uses a multi-stage sample design. For each sampled collection site, dwellings were selected from the 2006 Census using the household composition to better reach the target age groups. This sample design was a success for Cycle 1, hence was used again for Cycle 2 of the survey. Cycle 2 targets people aged 3 to 79 years old. Since its collection is taking place from fall 2009 to fall 2011, the 2006 Census frame deteriorates and must be updated to cover new dwellings and to be able to identify dwellings with youths 3 to 5 years old that are no longer identifiable using the Census. This presentation will begin with an overview of the survey design of the CHMS. Next, the update of the frame with the Address Register and the T1 Family File to improve coverage and reach the target population will be explained. Finally, results on the efficiency of this approach will be presented based on completed sites of Cycle 2.

    end of paste

    key phrase...... Since its collection is taking place from fall 2009 to fall 2011, the 2006 Census frame deteriorates......

    [ we are getting windshield survey data( qualitative) in some of the ? news ... not quantitative data]

    Seniors to date are not the highest users of the health dollar. For many decades even their rate of institutionalization hover around 3-5% of their own population.

    RE: use of physicians

    The new Family Health Team ( FHT) concept in Ontario has birthed an expansion of the long-standing " herding" of physician-visit disease categories.
    At present the classify and sort process is being handled by the wrong people ( designer medicine)and physicians ( of any age) simply plug in their diagnostic skills at key points in the treatment process. Follow up is performed by para-professionals.
    Remember McLuhan's tetrad? this ? innovation will result in the " aged" shunning the medical provision structure... and entering medical care settings at higher levels of care.

    Think of it( FHT) as the politician thinking this FHT model is like " the boy putting his finger in the dyke to prevent leakage" ... whereas.... in reality..... it is a blockage in the main flow which will cause flooding at a higher level of care need.

    Saddest of all for the physician is that the FHT structure is ideal IF managed under the authority of the individual physician ( remeber the Z ) ....NOT some conglomerate using the physician as little more than a " locum"....

    :(
  2. sharon [aka purley quirt]Dec 4, 2010 05:24 AM
    RE: the difference between "census" and "survey" data

    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/conferences/symposium2010/abs-res-eng.htm#a4

    paste

    02A-3 - Cycle 2 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey: Combining Census and administrative data to improve the efficiency of the survey frame

    Suzelle Giroux, Statistique Canada
    France Labrecque, Statistique Canada

    The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) uses a multi-stage sample design. For each sampled collection site, dwellings were selected from the 2006 Census using the household composition to better reach the target age groups. This sample design was a success for Cycle 1, hence was used again for Cycle 2 of the survey. Cycle 2 targets people aged 3 to 79 years old. Since its collection is taking place from fall 2009 to fall 2011, the 2006 Census frame deteriorates and must be updated to cover new dwellings and to be able to identify dwellings with youths 3 to 5 years old that are no longer identifiable using the Census. This presentation will begin with an overview of the survey design of the CHMS. Next, the update of the frame with the Address Register and the T1 Family File to improve coverage and reach the target population will be explained. Finally, results on the efficiency of this approach will be presented based on completed sites of Cycle 2.

    end of paste

    key phrase...... Since its collection is taking place from fall 2009 to fall 2011, the 2006 Census frame deteriorates......

    [ we are getting windshield survey data( qualitative) in some of the ? news ... not quantitative data]

    ...to be continued....
  3. sharon [aka purley quirt]Dec 4, 2010 05:25 AM
    ...continued..

    Seniors to date are not the highest users of the health dollar. For many decades even their rate of institutionalization hover around 3-5% of their own population.

    RE: use of physicians

    The new Family Health Team ( FHT) concept in Ontario has birthed an expansion of the long-standing " herding" of physician-visit disease categories.
    At present the classify and sort process is being handled by the wrong people ( designer medicine)and physicians ( of any age) simply plug in their diagnostic skills at key points in the treatment process. Follow up is performed by para-professionals.
    Remember McLuhan's tetrad? this ? innovation will result in the " aged" shunning the medical provision structure... and entering medical care settings at higher levels of care.
    Think of it as the politician thinking this FHT model is like " the boy putting his finger in the dyke to prevent leakage" ... whereas.... in reality..... it is a blockage in the main flow which will cause flooding at a higher level of care need.

    Saddest of all for the physician is that the FHT structure is ideal IF managed under the authority of the individual physician ( remeber the Z ) ....NOT some conglomerate using the physician as little more than a " locum"....

    :(
  4. Dec 21, 2010 11:03 PM
    I feel still new practitioners are not enough before the growing number of patients !

    http://www.globalhospitalsindia.com/
  5. Dec 28, 2010 11:48 PM
    I just love reading your article. In fact I have never come across such a wonderful piece of work. Of late I have been reading article related to this, but this has been until now the best ever article I may have come across.
  6. Jan 19, 2011 02:26 AM
    Blog are goods for every one where we get all information we needed nice job keep it up !
  7. Feb 9, 2011 10:04 PM
    Thanks for sharing .Keep posting articles like this.A good example of content presentation.A
    piece of information from you every now and then is really great.Great article post.I appreciate your writing skills.They are excellent.The knowledge of the subject is pretty good.
  8. Apr 14, 2011 12:09 AM
    Nice information, many thanks to the author. It is incomprehensible to me now, but in general, the usefulness and significance is overwhelming. Thanks again and good luck!!!
  9. Apr 15, 2011 02:59 AM
    Hi David,

    BlogFront.org is committed to uphold the quality standards of blogging. We strive to maintain and promote only the most credible blogs in their respective fields.

    Spam blogs or "splogs" has been a problem for some time now and people are getting confused about which blog to trust.

    We would like to thank you for maintaining such a reputable blog. We know that it takes time, effort and commitment to keep such a blog and as such, we have added your blog as one of the top Health Blogs.

    You can see your blog listed here: http://blogfront.org/health/2

    You can also claim your BlogFront Top Blogs badge at http://blogfront.org/badges/health

    Thank you for keeping your blog credible. Let's keep the blog revolution alive!

    Maria Blanchard
    BlogFront.org
    Blog Revolucion
  10. WhitneyMay 27, 2011 07:27 AM
    This blog post is very insightful and informative. Blogs like this are not only useful to Canadians but to those within other nations as well. This blog provides readers with a greater understanding of the current issues in Canadian healthcare. Thank you for the interesting read.
  11. Sep 3, 2011 08:17 AM
    Find all information about , foot surgery, ankle surgery, foot specialist, foot doctor, cosmetic foot surgery, podiatrist directory and health treatments.
  12. Jan 9, 2012 04:31 AM
    Great information..