Say Goodbye to Erectile Dysfunction with Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction, abbreviated ED, and otherwise known as impotence in men, is the failure of a man to obtain and maintain an erection which is direly needed for engaging in sexual intercourse.

Erectile dysfunction is a condition that is very common in much older men.  It has been estimated that about half of all men who are within the bracket age of 40 to 70 may have ED at a certain degree.  Depending on the circumstances and on the individual himself, erectile dysfunction can also affect those who are younger, even if they are just around the age of 25 or more.

Why does ED Occur in some Men?  Erectile dysfunction causes actually vary, and they can be physically related or psychologically related.  Physical causes of ED may include hormonal issues, surgery or injury, tightening of the blood vessels that lead towards the penis which is usually linked to high cholesterol, hypertension, or diabetes.  Psychological (mental) causes of ED may include depression, anxiety or problems with relationships. Read more…

Relistor may weaken the GI wall

When to beware

As all meds do, mythylnaltrexone bromide (Relistor) has its share of possible side effects, the most common being dizziness, flatulence, mild diarrhea, nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, and hyperhidrosis. Severe reactions include a serious case of any already mentioned, or allergic reactions.

Today, Health Canada and Wyeth Canada added a new possible adverse reaction to the list: a heightened risk of gastrointestinal perforation, especially in those with GI cancers and other conditions that could weaken the gastrointestinal wall.

When Relistor came onto the scene – it was approved by Health Canada on March 28, 2008 – it relieved opioid-induced constipation in palliative-care patients with incurable cancers, end-stage COPD from emphysema, heart failure, Alzheimer’s disease, and so on, when other laxative therapies could not – in under 30 minutes. Administered by subcutaneous injection, it blocks opioids from entering cells, allowing bowels to revert to normal function, while not interfering with the opioid’s ability to relieve pain.

The current warning advises discontinuing Relistor and seeking professional help if severe, persistent symptoms like abdominal pain intensified by movement, nausea and vomiting -- possibly accompanied by fever and chills – worsen, as these can be signs of GI perforation.

It makes one wonder, though, if the original studies on this drug should have lasted a wee bit longer than four months.
Milena Katz