Buy Metronidazole and Treat Bacterial Issues

Bacterial infections and diseases can be gotten nearly everywhere.  There is really no way of telling when you can get an infection.  The best way in avoiding getting infected is by practicing proper sanitation and hygiene as well as having a healthy immune system.  Still, this is just to prevent usual infections from developing.  If you do get infected, you need to use antibiotics to properly eliminate the infection out of your system.  Buy metronidazole as this is considered by many as one of the most effective antibiotic drugs in the market today.

If you buy metronidazole, you are assured that you will be able to treat the bacterial infection you have developed.  However, you cannot buy metronidazole over-the-counter because you need a medical prescription to buy metronidazole.  Without any medical prescription, the pharmacist will not dispense and allow you to buy metronidazole.  These days, antibiotics have strictly become prescription drugs only due to the abuse that some people have done.  This is why if you were to have any type of bacterial disease, your only option in being able to buy metronidazole is to visit your doctor and have your issue diagnosed.  If your doctor believes you need to buy metronidazole as antibiotic treatment, you will be given prescription to buy metronidazole.

There are two ways to buy metronidazole.  You can buy metronidazole at your local pharmacy or you can buy metronidazole online.  A lot of people actually buy metronidazole online these days as they are able to get lots of savings.  The prices of metronidazole at online shops simply cannot be matched by a physical shop since online shops do not have to pay a lot of dues and permits just to be able to sell.  The low price of metronidazole is actually what draws most people who need to use metronidazole to buy metronidazole online. Read more…

Pesticide punch

Wading through the produce aisles

If you think apples don’t taste like they used to, you’re probably right. The Environmental Working Group (http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/) has just updated its list showing pesticide levels in 53 types of produce, and apples – formally No. 4 of their “Dirty Dozen” – now weigh in at No. 1!

Researchers at Purdue University in Lafayette, IN, analyzed 51,000 pesticide residue tests done over 10 years (2000-2009) by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Federal Food and Drug Administration. 98% of the apples tested contained pesticides out of over 700 samples. And most of the fruit and veggies under scrutiny had been washed and peeled, in order to represent more realistic eating conditions.

Others that made the Dirty Dozen were celery, strawberries and peaches – which contained 57 different chemicals – along with greens such as kale, lettuce and hot peppers – treated with as many as 97 pesticides.

If we stick to Canada’s Food Guide we’d consume a minimum of five servings of Mother Nature’s bounty every day. By choosing these from the least contaminated foods we’d ingest less than 2 pesticides. However, picking them from the Dirty Dozen would up our daily pesticide intake to 14 different chemicals – some of which are associated with nervous system disorders, chronic problems including cancer, endocrine system dysfunction, and lower intelligence levels in kids – who may (along with those in the fetal stage) be the most vulnerable to the synthetic residues.

There’s also evidence that the phosphorus-rich fertilizers used in fields have contributed to the toxic blue-green algae blooms in our freshwater lakes, reported to cause vision loss and difficulty walking in some people who’ve been in contact with it, but that’s another story.

When organic produce isn’t readily available -- at the market, or due to budgetary constraints – these lists could be your best shopping companions.
Milena Katz

UBC hospice gets rubber stamp

Hospice residents are the winners

It’s been five months since the UBC put their plan to build a hospice on the Point Grey Campus on hold. After checking out 15 locations, the Board of Governors agreed yesterday to stick with the plan, despite objections raised by the mostly new-immigrant Asian community living in the high-rise condo facing the sight. They say their opposition to the 15-bed facility has nothing to do with fears that property values might decrease or the "idea" of a hospice but rather deeply held cultural convictions based on their conceptions around death.

According to Professor of Chinese Religions Paul Crowe, Chinese believe “on the assumption the world as we understand it is a unified, single place that’s inhabited by both the living and the spirits of the deceased; and there’s this deeply held concern that we need to keep the spirits of the deceased separate from the living.”

Residents of the luxury tower say the prospect of having the hospice as neighbour has already triggered sickness and stress for them and their families.

UBC delved deeper into possible concerns and did further study on the potential impact on traffic and property values. They concluded that the hospice development be ratified with additional conditions. They recommended that UBC plant trees between the two facilities, maintain outreach programs for new immigrants, and “identify other housing opportunities on campus for residents of the adjacent building who wish to move.” Also, UBC’s VP Stephen Owen stated, “An open-air courtyard in the hospice will be open-air but screened so that it is not visible to the outside.”

The $15 million hospice would be used as a place for research and education, along with providing hospice care, a sorely lacking service for dying Canadians.
Milena Katz